3Shape Focuses on Dentistry

The most popular software these days is that designed with the user in mind, where all aspects of the software are focused on delivering the function required by the user. When people see such software, they immediately resonate with it and are more likely to use it. There are countless examples of this effect. 
 
But has this approach been properly used in 3D printing yet? Quite often we see hardware of a very general nature, leaving the function completely up to the users themselves. Similarly, we often see 3D print service bureaus offering very generic services - which are indeed useful for many people, but won't deeply attract specific markets. 
 
One successful 3D example of this approach is 3Shape, a company dedicated to producing advanced 3D dental equipment. Their main 3D product is the D700 3D scanner, a device specifically designed for dental scanning. The form, fit and associated software make it very easy for their users and it's made them successful. 
 
We're wondering whether it makes sense to produce 3D printers with more focus on particular types of printing, instead of the generic 3D printers of today. Yes, there are printers dedicated to specific materials, such as metal, but what about customer usage? Would there be a difference between a 3D printer optimized for figurine makers versus one optimized for medical use? We think so. Do the manufacturers? 
 
Via 3Shape

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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