Three Delta 3D Printers: How To Tell Them Apart

Recently we’ve seen an increase in the number of “delta” 3D printers being produced. “Delta” refers to the rather unique extruder mechanical movement: arms attached to three towers intelligently coordinate “tipping motions” to smoothly move a level extruder platform through the build volume. 
 
These machines are easy to recognize: three tall posts with an armature suspended between them. They’re often 3D printing fantastically tall objects, far larger than can be done in conventional “XYZ Cartesian” 3D printers. 
 
But sometimes they’re hard to tell apart. We at Fabbaloo see a great many new 3D printers coming by, but something confused us recently. There’s the Delta Tower, Deltaprintr and the DeltaMaker. They’re all delta printers with very similar names. 
 
How can you tell them apart? Here’s a quick guide.
 
The Delta Tower is designed for commercial use. It’s an expensive unit, but it should be as it provides the tallest print volume of any personal 3D printer (580mm) - and includes a self-leveling bed. We examined this unit in person at the recent 3D Printshow in London. It’s priced at USD$8000. 
 
The Deltaprintr is a very inexpensive way to get into delta printing, at only USD$500! For that price you’ll receive a complete kit to build the printer yourself. It’s possible to purchase an assembled version for USD$655, also a great deal. The Deltaprintr cannot print as tall as the 580mm Delta Tower, but can accomplish 305mm. Deltaprintr also offers an XL version able to print even higher, but as of this writing its height is “To Be Determined”. It should be a simple matter of lengthening the three aluminum supports. By the way, their Kickstarter campaign remains open until January 4th, if you’re interested in this machine. 
  
The Deltamaker is said to be a “clean and elegant personal 3D printer built on a delta robot platform”, and it certainly appears to be so. The USD$1,999 device can print up to 279mm tall, somewhat less than the other two deltas described here. 
 
If these three don’t suit you, there are plenty of alternative delta printers available that don’t happen to include the word “delta” in their name, such as the Rostock. 
 
Three delta 3D printers, each with very different characteristics. Choose wisely. 
 

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

+