3D Shook’s All You Can Eat 3D Models

Tired of searching the usual repositories for great 3D models? 3D Shook has an offer we think you might like. 

Most 3D model repositories operate on the “one at a time” approach: search for a model, select and download. Occasionally you may have to purchase a particularly good model. 

This approach is intended to encourage more 3D designers to produce more content; pay-for 3D models should provide an incentive for artists to create more. 

But is it working? We’re not sure, but we don’t see a great many 3D artists making tons of cash. Our theory is that most people using personal 3D printers these days are happy to print out pretty much anything, thus they are less likely to buy a 3D model. They can print something else that’s free. 

At this point, there is an awful lot of free 3D models to be had. Thingiverse, which is likely the world’s largest repository of printable 3D models, is entirely free of charge and now contains around 700,000 models. There are similar alternative repositories, each with a mix of paid and free models. 

The problem has always been the ability to find great models. Yes, there are some in Thingiverse, but it’s terribly difficult to sift through literally hundreds of models to find the one you want. 

3D Shook takes a completely different approach. They’re providing a large, entirely curated set of proven-printable 3D models. Rather than depending on the whims of designers to donate their works or pay artists on commission when a model is purchased, 3D Shook has a different idea. 

You subscribe to their service. 

And download all you can print. 

That’s it! They hire brilliant designers behind the scenes and make them produce unique 3D models specifically made for easy 3D printing. 

3D Shook’s site provides over 500 models today and we’re told they have around 1,500 in the queue. They’re releasing approximately 100-150 new models each month in 49 different categories that should cover every use case. Imagine a collection of excellent picture frames, or incredible masks. That’s what you’ll find in 3D Shook. 

Not only are the models designed in house, but the company also spends considerable effort to package them up in an effective manner. Each model has a dedicated page on which there’s a description and multiple professional photographs of actual prints made from the model. Also, they provide basic means of customizing the 3D model by resizing, adding text and a few other tweaks, so that you can customize their models to your own needs. 

So you’re now thinking, “Why should I pay for 3D models? There’s tons of others I can get for free!” 

That’s true, but 3D Shook’s models are very impressive. We examined a series of them at the recent 3D Printshow and found, without exception, amazing prints. Prints of models we’d never seen anywhere previously, like this amazing Plague Mask shown at top. Notice how it has been carefully designed to appear leather-like, with just the right type of curve and shine. That’s what all their models are like. 

How much does it cost? 3D Shook offers a variety of plans, including, surprisingly, a free plan! With the free plan you’ll get access to a set of interesting models on their “Trial Gallery”. When you upgrade to a paid subscription, you’ll gain access to the ENTIRE library and can freely download them. 

We asked 3D Shook CEO Joseph Seroussi if there’s a risk that a client could suddenly download the entire library and make off with it. He explained that cannot happen, as there are limits to the number of models you can download. Essentially, they limit you to a multiple of the number of prints you could reasonably print per day. We think that’s a very fair approach - as long as you choose your models carefully. 

Pricing is as follows:

  • Free: access to Trial Gallery only
  • USD$5: access for a 48 hour period, the “Weekend Plan”
  • USD$15/month
  • USD$75/six months
  • USD$100/year

Yes, it’s a paid service, but think about it: for USD$100 you can get access to hundreds, perhaps eventually thousands, of very high quality printable models for an entire year. Perhaps not a bad deal! 

Via 3D Shook

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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