Design of the Week: Glasses Polar 1

The Glasses Polar 1 by Michal Fanta

The Glasses Polar 1 by Michal Fanta

This week’s selection is the suddenly useful Glasses Polar 1 by designer Michal Fanta. 

The Czech-based designer developed the 3D printable eyewear for a recent design competition at iMakr. 

The curious design might be seen as fashionable, but in reality this is - and has been for centuries - a very practical design. The “slit” goggles have been used by Inuit people in the far north for eons as a means of seeing in the brilliant snow-covered landscapes found in their traditional lands. When you have no means to manufacture lenses, you make do with what you have on hand. Here’s an example of such goggles:

Traditional Inuit snow goggles

Traditional Inuit snow goggles

Now you can 3D print your own version - and since it is 3D printed, you can adjust the size to ensure a perfect fit on your face. It may take a couple of print iterations, however, to get it correct. 

Is this print actually useful? Given the recent wintery weather activity in many of the northern regions of our planet, maybe so! 

Only a flat simple joint appears on the Glasses Polar 1

Only a flat simple joint appears on the Glasses Polar 1

The 3D model is broken into three parts: the frames and two arms, which must be glued together. Unfortunately this design does not have a hinge or even a snap-fit connection. Nevertheless, you can successfully construct this eyewear, but you’ll not be able to fold it up afterwards. 

Smooth curves on these 3D printable snow goggle frames

Smooth curves on these 3D printable snow goggle frames

Printing this item is slightly challenging as the frame part really doesn't have a flat surface, so you will most certainly require support structures. 

The design is available at no charge for download from MyMiniFactory, an excellent source of countless great 3D models. 

Via MyMiniFactory and Michal Fanta
Image Credit: Wikimedia
 

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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