Arevo Labs’ Fascinating Materials and Software

In the middle of Silicon Valley lies the headquarters of an advanced 3D printing company: Arevo Labs, who produce some extremely interesting materials and software. 

Arevo Labs focuses on the most advanced, high performance levels of 3D printing. They produce a number of unusual materials for additive manufacturing, as well as innovative software that runs their making equipment. 

Currently, they offer three types of AM polymers: 

For Aerospace, Medical, Jigs & Fixtures, Quantevo PAEK (Polyaryletherketone), as a metal replacement due to its strength and non-corrosive properties. It is available “plain”, or as a composite with carbon fiber or carbon nanotubes! 

For the Oil and Gas industry, Katevo PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) provides a stronger print than nylon and can be used in “harsh environments”. It is also available as a composite with carbon fiber. 

For medical use, Xanevo PARA (Polyarylamide) provides near expansion-free finish for precision medical instruments, and can be mixed with glass fiber.

Here you can see a chart of the relative strengths of these unusual materials. 

Arevo also employs very intelligent 3D printing slicing software that can precisely control the layout of carbon fiber within a given print, even automatically determining the optimum 3D orientation for strength. 

What I find most interesting is their 3D printing software permits non-layered 3D printing. In other words, they can control a robot arm to extrude in 3D paths, which might just happen to match the most appropriate paths for strength and surface finish, as you can see in this image. 

Is this service for you? Perhaps, if you’re a major manufacturing company that requires the extreme capabilities of Avero’s products and services. For reference, here’s a few of their clients:

  • Northrup Grumman
  • Schlumberger
  • Johnson & Johnson
  • AIRBUS
  • Tesla
  • Le Mans
  • Solvay
  • NASA / JPL

Would your company need such services? 

Via Avero Labs

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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