Design of the Week: Pulmonary

"Pulmonary" 3D printed earrings based on human lung structure

"Pulmonary" 3D printed earrings based on human lung structure

This week’s selection is the peculiar “Pulmonary” earrings by British designer William Stanley. 

Stanley operates a small online boutique shop where various 3D printed jewelry designs are featured. Actually, Stanley is a trained Architect, but his experience in that field exposed him to the capabilities of 3D printing technology, triggering this work in fashion. He explains:

With his background in architecture, William began making jewellery from parts of his architectural models whilst at the Architectural Association. Utilising 3D printing as his main means of manufacture, William's work is inspired by the endless beautiful forms found within the natural and biological world. 

Alongside geometric designs, William takes images from electron microscopes, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), photography and life drawing and uses 3D software to digitally dissect, deconstruct, reconstruct and assemble these objects into pieces of jewellery that capture the varied beauty of what he finds exploring the world.

This particular item, Pulmonary, is based on an actual 3D medical MRI scan of a human lung. Sounds a bit icky, but I’m sure you’ll agree it’s quite the complex design and carries its own delicate beauty. 

Three versions of "Pulmonary", a 3D printed earring based on human lung structure

Three versions of "Pulmonary", a 3D printed earring based on human lung structure

There are three versions of the design, Small, Medium and Large, shown here in the three materials available: dyed nylon, sterling silver and 18k gold. These are obviously priced at vastly different levels, ranging from £30 (USD$43) for nylon, £110 (USD$160) for silver and a whopping £3,170 (USD$4,600) for the gold. 

Purchases of Pulmonary 3D printed earrings will result in a donation on your behalf

Purchases of Pulmonary 3D printed earrings will result in a donation on your behalf

Note that Stanley will be donating a proportional amount to the British Lung Association should you choose to purchase one of these fascinating designs.

Via William Stanley

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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