Design of the Week: Avoid Chandelier

Janne Kyttanen's amazing Avoid Chandelier 3D printed furnishing

Janne Kyttanen's amazing Avoid Chandelier 3D printed furnishing

This week’s selection is the beautiful “Avoid Chandelier” by long-time 3D designer Janne Kyttanen. 

Kyttanen has been responsible for many ground-breaking designs in the 3D world, mainly items for installation in the home, such as this incredible chandelier. 

The chandelier is designed from mathematical concepts: 

The form of this design is influenced by Lie sphere geometry, a geometrical theory in which the fundamental concept is the sphere. In Lie sphere geometry all lines should be regarded as spheres of infinite radius and points in the plane should be regarded as spheres of zero radius. Measuring 1.5m in diameter, this opulent sculptural piece provides warm illumination in even the most monumental of spaces.
Janne Kyttanen sitting beside the beautiful 3D printed Avoid side table - with rhodium finish

Janne Kyttanen sitting beside the beautiful 3D printed Avoid side table - with rhodium finish

The chandelier is a companion piece to an earlier work by Kyttanen, also called Avoid. It’s a small 3D printed side table, which, by coincidence is currently being shown at Galerie VIVID in Rotterdam for the first time in a rhodium metal finish. 

Meanwhile, Avoid Chandelier, was shown publicly for the first time this past week in Miami. 

While the work is, as usual, outstanding, there’s more to the story. Kyttanen has until very recently been in the employ of 3D Systems as Creative Director, having been acquired by 3D Systems as part of his previous venture, Freedom Of Creation. However, when 3D Systems changed gears and stepped away from the consumer market, I suspect they also dropped priority on artistic works, leaving Kyttanen in a challenging spot. 

Janne Kyttanen wearing one of his 3D printed works

Janne Kyttanen wearing one of his 3D printed works

He left 3D Systems in March of this year to start a new venture, “What The Future Venture Capital” or “WTF”, which actually has very little to do with 3D printing, and instead focuses on identifying promising technology startups and marshaling them through initial growth. 

But in spite of that, it seems that he’s still involved in 3D print design, which is certainly good news. 

Via Janne Kyttanen

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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