The Foodini 3D Printer Lives!

Crackers made from red pepper 3D printed on the Foodini

Crackers made from red pepper 3D printed on the Foodini

The last time we wrote about the Foodini 3D printer, it was April of 2014, more than two years ago. Now, the machine is available! 

The Foodini by Natural Machines is a bit different from some of the other food printing prototypes, which essentially are normal 3D printers with a paste extruder attached. The Foodini actually can cook your food, too! 

It operates by using “food capsules”, which are loaded with pasty versions of the ingredients for the particular recipe being undertaken. Paste is extruded in the appropriate shapes and layers, as you might imagine any 3D printer doing. The big difference is that if the food requires cooking, the Foodini can do so by heating the food to the required temperatures and durations. 

The elusive Foodini 3D food printer

The elusive Foodini 3D food printer

The company’s initial Kickstarter intended on delivering the machine in 2015, which has long past. I had begun to suspect the company had faded out, as so many others have done, but then a surprise email notification from them explained: 

Foodini is already officially in production: we successfully completed and shipped a production run at the same price point we are offering you today. We kept the first production run to a small volume to test the manufacturing lines. We're very happy with the output and the high quality of Foodini, and we are now moving forward with a larger - yet limited quantity - production run. The initial production run sold out in a short period of time, and due to demand we expect the same thing will happen with this production run... so place your order quickly.

They’re offering the Foodini in this production run for USD$4,000, which is a bit more than you’d pay for a typical 3D printer. But this isn’t one. It’s a 3D printing OVEN! 

With this machine and some food-design ingenuity, you could create some pretty amazing food products: 

Valentine’s Day chocolate mousse and caramel sauce 3D printed on the Foodini

Valentine’s Day chocolate mousse and caramel sauce 3D printed on the Foodini

Breadsticks made in the shape of spoons 3D printed on the Foodini

Breadsticks made in the shape of spoons 3D printed on the Foodini

Tangyuan 3D printed on the Foodini

Tangyuan 3D printed on the Foodini

Salad inspired by Aalto vase 3D printed on the Foodini

Salad inspired by Aalto vase 3D printed on the Foodini

Designer Fish and Chips 3D printed on the Foodini

Designer Fish and Chips 3D printed on the Foodini

Amazing, aren't they? 

Now a word of caution: I’ve always been a bit suspicious of the viability of 3D food printers due to the ingredient constraints, slow speeds of printing and safety. That said, I’d consider the Foodini and experimental device with which one could test many different food concepts. It’s a machine designed to print food right from the start, unlike most other food extruders. 

Via Natural Machines

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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