You Might Say This is a Titanic 3D Print

A 1/72 size 3D printed model of the Titanic

A 1/72 size 3D printed model of the Titanic

BernCo Models has produced a 1/72 3D printed version of the famous Titanic liner - and it sails just like the real thing. 

Australia-based BernCo Models is a small operation apparently producing model boats. But in this instance proprietor Bernie decided to 3D print the components for a Titanic replica. 

Not only does it look like the original ship, but you can sail this one as well, as it is equipped with and engine and remote controls. 

This 3.7m 3D printed Titanic sails by remote control

This 3.7m 3D printed Titanic sails by remote control

The ship is quite large, 3.7m (over 12 ft) in length and, when finished and carrying concrete ballast, weighs over 200kg. The 3D printed parts take up 13kg of that total, which no doubt required a significant time to 3D print. 

This Titanic is so large it must be transported by trailer to the water for launch. 

The 3D printed 1/72 model of the Titanic mounted on a boat trailer for transport

The 3D printed 1/72 model of the Titanic mounted on a boat trailer for transport

It’s not the largest 3D printed boat by length; the current record holder is still Jim Smith, who 3D printed a full-size kayak - which is actually usable. While BernCo’s Titanic isn’t as long, it’s a greater feat of 3D printing in my opinion. 

The BernCo Titanic is eerily like its ill-fated namesake. This episode sounds so familiar: 

I maneuvered her to a straight, and got her to maximum speed. I had to get into a light jog along the shore to keep up with her. Without meaning to, I was suddenly opposed with a hauntingly familiar situation. 
The end of the canal was closing quicker than I expected, and turned rather sharply to the left. So, I began to turn the tiny little rudder, and she slowly began to come about. At this stage I still had full thrust ahead, but she wasn't turning hard enough! 
About a quarter into the failing turn, I decided that I was going too quick... Too late! It was now that I killed all thrust to try and slow her down... That's when it all fell apart, and my chilling revelation occurred. As soon as I killed the thrust halfway into the turn, the ship suddenly stopped turning and coasted dead ahead, despite the rudder still being hard over... 
Luckily, while all this was happening, I was wading out to the corner to catch her, and saved the day like Godzilla turned good...
But that feeling I got when she suddenly stopped turning would probably have been what Murdoch felt when he realized he f****d up! I learned a very valuable lesson with my oversized model, and the real Titanic. Once I realized this simple quirk, I was able to control her a lot better. But every time I have to remind myself of this, I am also reminded that this is the same reason the real one is currently on the bottom of the Atlantic... 
The rudder only works under thrust!!
The 3D printed Titanic model includes considerable detail

The 3D printed Titanic model includes considerable detail

If you are very ambitious, you can make one of these yourself. BernCo Models is selling the 119 STL 3D files on CGTrader for USD$400. From there you will apparently need to print them on a 3D printer with a 300 x 300 x 300mm build volume, which cuts out many small machines. BernCo suggests using PLA plastic for reliability and that you’ll need around 45 (forty five!) 1kg spools to complete the job. 

Or BernCo can do this all for you if you’re willing to pay them. 

The size of the much larger Titanic replica

The size of the much larger Titanic replica

Finally, it turns out that the 1/72 3D printed model was really a prototype for a far larger, less-3D print oriented project: build a manned, coal-powered Titanic! 

Worlds biggest working Titanic model kit!

Bernie is raising funds for Worlds biggest working Titanic model kit! on Kickstarter! This project will be to produce an accurate, 11.2 meter (36 foot), working steam prototype of the infamous RMS Titanic.

You’re asking yourself “Coal Powered???” Yes, that’s exactly what was designed. A stoker would manually load coal into the three boilers that would power the ship. Incredible. 

The original plan for a coal-powered Titanic replica

The original plan for a coal-powered Titanic replica

BernCo Models even launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund this project, but it was unsuccessful. 

Via Facebook, Kickstarter and CGTrader

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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