The ComeTrue T10 Color 3D Printer

The ComeTrue T10, a full color 3D printer

The ComeTrue T10, a full color 3D printer

There are certainly not a great many choices when seeking a full, RGB color texture 3D printer, but MicroJet’s ComeTrue T10 is one of them. 

The ComeTrue T10 3D printer is made by MicroJet Technology Co. Ltd, a Taiwan-based company with 400 staff and 20 years of experience building ink jet heads for 2D printers. It seems that the company is attempting to leverage this expertise into producing a color 3D printer. 

ComeTrue is the brand under which the T10 exists, suggesting that MicroJet might be marketing additional 3D printing equipment with this brand in the future. 

The ComeTrue T10 3D printer appears to use a process similar to the ZCorp process, since acquired by 3D Systems: use inkjet heads to selectively drop colorized binder on a flat bed of fine white plastic powder. By repeating this process over many layers, you can 3D print a full color object. 

Spare binder material is in a handy slot case on the side of the ComeTrue T10 color 3D printer

Spare binder material is in a handy slot case on the side of the ComeTrue T10 color 3D printer

After printing, a second unit is used to remove the excess powder using an air wash. To complete finishing, the print is heated to bake in the binder, followed by an application of a secondary liquid binder to solidify the print. MicroJet provides equipment and supplies for all stages of this process. 

Sample prints from the ComeTrue T10 color 3D printer

Sample prints from the ComeTrue T10 color 3D printer

Prints are of good quality, at least equal to what I’ve seen with 3D Systems’ comparable equipment. However, the target price for the T10 seems to be around USD$30,000, which might be a bargain compared to 3D Systems’ options. 

It’s a bit challenging to get one of these machines, as MicroJet is seeking resellers in the West. If you happen to be a 3D print reseller, you might want to check out the T10. 

Via ComeTrue

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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