5 Questions with Gary Miller

Carbon's Gary Miller, center, with VP of Business Phil Di Simone and Head of Production Development Dave Moore

Carbon's Gary Miller, center, with VP of Business Phil Di Simone and Head of Production Development Dave Moore

Two years ago, Gary Miller of 3D Print Bureau talked about how the imminent arrival of Carbon 3D and their CLIP technology will make the 3D printing industry as a whole raise its game. Read what he is up to now.

Fabbaloo: For the last two years, you were the Managing Director of 3D Print Bureau, but now you are the Production Development Engineer for Carbon in the U.K. Why the change? 

Gary Miller: I have been intrigued by Carbon’s technology ever since meeting Phil DeSimone at Euromold. Over the past 14 years, I've built and managed U.K service bureaus and recently made a career decision to continue to help solve solutions using one technology… Carbon.

Fabbaloo: What excites you about working for Carbon? What attracted you to them?

Gary Miller: I've worked with Carbon in a friendly advisory capacity over the last three years, and it’s definitely an exciting company to work for. This has given me a unique opportunity to learn about where the company is heading and to be a part of its growth. Over the last few years, the industry has started to push additive manufacturing towards traditional manufacturing; working in the service bureau sector meant I have dealt with all the proven technologies for different customer applications. My view is that Carbon's process and materials are the ideal solutions for helping push additive manufacturing into production, which has not been done previously.

Fabbaloo: Carbon is still a relatively young company, founded in 2013 with headquarters in California. How long have they been in the U.K. and what are their plans for the region?

Gary Miller: Since the company was founded, Carbon has been focused on the U.S. market. Carbon has received tremendous interest in the U.K. from manufacturers and strategic partners who share its vision of transforming the manufacturing industry through innovations in 3D printing, and they have been waiting patiently for 2 years. While we haven’t launched in the U.K. yet, we hope to begin shipping machines to the region very soon. More to come!

Fabbaloo: When and how did you first get interested / started in 3D Printing? What was your very first 3D print?

Gary Miller: I first became interested in rapid prototyping, as 3D printing was known back then, when working for IPF. I had been running CNC machines and fabricating plastics, which is very different. We had seen the technology and over coffee one morning decided it was worth investing in. I wasn't directly involved with the printer initially, but I was very keen to have a play, printing a wrench for the first print (I think a wrench back then was everyone's first print) and watching it move without any need for assembly was a jaw-drop moment. 

Fabbaloo: You’ve overseen many unusual 3D print projects in your career. What was your most memorable 3D print moment?

Gary Miller: There's been so many memorable builds it's difficult to choose just one. I've printed a gift that was given by British Prime Minister David Cameron to Israeli President Shimon Peres. Some of the film work I've been involved in has been great fun. Helping talented clients such as FBFX means I've been involved in producing hero props for movie characters such as Star-Lord's head piece for Guardians of the Galaxy plus many more prints for film. This eventually got me on Sky News TV for a live segment for 4 minutes and 22 seconds, which was mildly terrifying. I've even printed tiny, highly detailed feet for royalty. But, my favorite will be something that helped improved someone’s way of life; knowing that you've had the tiniest input into something so massive to someone else is hugely rewarding. The most unusual was probably a 3D-printed record. The sound wasn't terrific, but it suggests what might be possible in the future.  

Via Carbon

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