3DMonstr’s Super New 3D Printer Series

Rendering of the new Super-Rex series of large-format 3D printers from 3DMonstr

Rendering of the new Super-Rex series of large-format 3D printers from 3DMonstr

Going by their name, 3DMonstr must produce large 3D printers, but now they’re even larger. 

The company still produces their large T-Rex line, which offers 3D print volumes of up to 610 x 610 x 610mm on their TRex-24, which is certainly not small. But now they’ve announced something even bigger: the Super-Rex line.

The Super-Rex machines offer some very interesting capabilities: 

  • Up to FOUR extruders, each capable of 3D printing PLA, ABS, HIPS, PVA, Nylon, PET, NinjaFlex, and Paraffin Wax. They say they will work on making the extruders capable of even more materials in the future.
  • An automatic tool changer that swaps any of the four extruders into the printing motion system (the other three remain “parked” in standby hot mode). This ensures reliable multi-material printing, as “other” nozzles aren’t moving around the print surface causing troubles. 
  • Multiple nozzle sizes, up to an enormous 1.5mm version for very rapid (but coarse) 3D prints.
  • Water cooling on the extruders to ensure very precise temperature control.
  • Temperature controlled enclosed build chamber for increased print reliability. I’m not sure if an air filtration system is included, however. 

And the new line also incorporates the unique features of the T-Rex series, such as automated bed leveling, standalone touch-screen console and a multi-zone heated print surface.

The Super-Rex will come in three models: 

  • Super-Rex-333, 1m x 1m x 1m
  • Super-Rex-363, 1m x 2m x 1m
  • Super-Rex-393, 1m x 3m x 1m

These machines put 3DMonstr in direct competition with other low-cost, large-scale 3D printer vendors such as BigRep and 3D Platform. 3DMonstr has not publicly stated pricing, but they’ll have to out do those two competitors to succeed. 

One issue, however, is that they have not published a photo of the Super-Rex machines or their prints; all we were able to find was the rendering at top. It’s also not clear when the products will be available for purchase, so it is unknown the current state of development of this series of machines. Stay tuned! 

Via 3DMonstr

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

+