Daniela Carr: “Who Wouldn’t Want To Learn About How The World Around Us Is Made?”

Daniela Carr: “Who Wouldn’t Want To Learn About How The World Around Us Is Made?”
Daniela Carr [Source: Women in 3D Printing]

Following six years with Artec 3D as Head of Marketing and PR, Daniela Carr now holds the position of Chief Marketing Officer.

Hailing from the U.K. Daniela majored in Italian and Russian at the University of London, and achieved an MA in translation. Following two formative years running events and leading the team at London’s Academia Rossica, an independent arts organisation, Daniela next stepped into editing and translation in the film and news industries.

Currently based in Artec 3D’s Moscow office, Daniela in her free time enjoys good wine, Nigerian literature, and particularly cuddly cats.

Nora Toure: Daniela, could you let us know about your background and your journey to Additive Manufacturing?

Daniela Carr: My journey to additive manufacturing was completely random! My background was in promoting arts and culture, organizing and marketing film festivals and literary events. One night I met a friend to discuss some difficulties which had arisen in my job at the time and we talked into the night. A friend of hers was giving her a lift home and offered to drop me off as well.

This friend was Leonid Volkov, CBDO of Artec 3D at the time. We chatted during the 15-minute taxi ride and the next day he emailed me, asking if I’d like to come for an interview at Artec 3D! I never considered working in tech before, but it was the best thing that could have happened to me.

Nora Toure: What is the most impressive or impactful use of 3D technology you’ve seen so far?

Daniela Carr: What I love about 3D technology, specifically 3D scanning, is how it really makes a difference in so many different areas. From cutting down waste in manufacturing by checking the quality of parts and saving those which might otherwise have been scrapped, to making better fitting prosthetics and orthopaedic devices, giving people a much better quality of life or preserving incredible cultural objects and buildings for future generations.

We even have a case where one of our scanners was used to reverse engineer and 3D print a tail for an alligator, which allowed him to swim again!

Read the rest at Women in 3D Printing

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