Additively’s Additively Application

One of the most annoying aspects of using 3D parts printing services is the tedious process of requesting quotes. Now that problem seems to be solved.

Additively has introduced a new application, the “Additively Application”, which provides a “single point of access to 3D printing”. Basically its a meta-layer over top of vendor quoting systems; it can send requests to over 300 print services using over 250 different materials. 

The app is provided free of charge for “normal” usage and as a subscription service for “intensive usage”. Normal usage appears to be “Up to 3 requests for quotations per month”. Additively provides several paid upgrade levels, including a €70 (USD$74) monthly charge for up to 20 quotes per month. If you need more, they’ll be able to help you with a customized plan. 

Not only does the app blast out and receive quotes, it follows up by actually placing orders from the best identified suppliers in each quoting situation. 

One interesting feature is the ability to rate providers. This permits shoppers to gauge whether an inexpensive provider is actually a party they’d like to deal with, as sometimes you get what you pay for. 

Some companies prefer to work with a smaller set of providers for various reasons, and the Additively Application supports this by enabling “preferred vendors” as a subset of the entire provider database. 

Quoting always requires sending a 3D model to the provider for examination and quote processing, but sometimes this is problematic if the 3D model is part of a private project. Additively handles this scenario by providing a kind of centralized Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) system. They’ve already signed specialized NDA’s with the providers that ensure your intellectual property is properly protected. This makes the service much easier to use. 

We think this service could provide a significant improvement in company workflows by eliminating a heck of a lot of emails, logins, and web page visits. 

Via Additively

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

+