BotObjects Tells More - But Not Enough

You may recall the mysterious launch of the ProDesk30 from BotObjects the other week? It was said to be an amazing Full Color personal 3D plastic extrusion printer. Many observers were highly skeptical of this claim, particularly because little evidence or even specifications had been released by BotObjects. 
 
Now that's changed. A bit. 
 
BotObjects has released more information, including pricing (USD$2,849-$3,749) and specifications for the ProDesk30 models: 
 
  • Full color FDM-based printing system
  • 5-color PLA cartridge system
  • PVA support material cartridge
  • ABS supported with additional cartridges (not included in standard package)
  • PLA/PVA/ABS filament diameter 1.75mm
  • Exterior case dimensions 475mm, 365mm, 365mm (H,W,D)
  • Build platform dimensions 300mm, 275mm, 275mm (H,W,D)
  • 175mm/s max printing speed
  • 25 micron printing accuracy in z direction
  • Fully automatic system set up - plug and play
  • Auto levelling heated build platform
  • Dual extruder head
  • Tri-fan air system
 
Looks pretty good, doesn't it? But is it real? How can they actually print full color at such tiny resolutions? On their site they now show a few example prints. 
 
A vase. 
 
A Robot in several pieces, assembled together. 
 
A musical recorder. 
 
Do you notice anything about these color prints? We did. All of them simply change color on layers. The vase in particular exhibits this most clearly. It appears (and we're saying this because we've done it on other extrusion 3D printers) that an orange filament was swapped out for a white filament in mid-vase. The same effect is seen on the other objects. 
 
That's NOT color 3D printing. 
 
That's been done before many times and is not particularly useful, unless you're looking for rainbow-ish objects. 
 
We are now becoming a lot more skeptical of BotObject's claims and it seems we're not the only ones. SolidSmack has a very critical writeup, and they propose there are reasons why BotObjects has not shown up on Kickstarter. 
 
BotObjects, if you're listening, now is the time to reveal some more convincing evidence. 
 

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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