3DCADemy To Offer Training in 3D

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Toronto-based 3DCADemy is preparing to offer training in 3D skills to interested parties. 

The startup has not yet launched its offerings, but the first course they will offer is entitled, “Advanced 3D Printing: Producing Real Objects from Concept to Design”. The description: 

Advancements in 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing are providing today’s Product Designers with exciting opportunities to make new parts and products that cannot be made through traditional manufacturing methods. This course is for those who want to learn Product and Industrial design skills from expert teachers who work in the field. With a hands on learning environment, the participants will learn how to develop a product concept from a sketch into a fully working prototype that is manufactured on an industrial level 3D printer. Upon completion of the course, each participant will leave with a physical and online portfolio showcasing his or her product from concept to production. In addition to learning important skills for professional development, this course will also enable participants to demonstrate their skills and portfolio pieces to future employers or clients.

The evening classes will be held weekly in three-hour chunks over a 10 week period, totalling over 30 hours of training. The course will include printing of at least two 3D models developed during the course. 

To participate, you must apply by sending your resume to 3DCADemy who will evaluate your application for inclusion in the limited number of seats for this course. 

As this is a first effort at training, we’re very interested to see how this proceeds. 3DCADemy’s approach here seems quite similar to the training offered in New York and London by iMakr, which we feel is the level of training that folks new to 3D printing should receive in order to be productive. 

3DCADemy’s course appears to be locally held in Toronto, but there is no reason such training could not be web-based and widespread. Yes, 3D printers are used to produce objects, but that could be done remotely as well using 3D print services or simply email 3D model files to headquarters. Perhaps 3DCADemy will eventually offer this training to other areas in this way.

Via 3DCADemy

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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