WonderLuk’s Popup Experiment Illustrates 3D Print Venture Challenges

WonderLuk plans to exhibit their innovative 3D printed jewelry at a London popup store this week, but we think this demonstrates the challenges facing many 3D print-using startups. 

We’ve written about WonderLuk previously; unlike some 3D print services, they take great care to select appropriate jewelry designers and curate their content to ensure they provide a high-quality selection of 3D printed women’s jewelry for sale. 

Many of their fashionable designs are quite unique and truly leverage 3D print technology to produce items not really feasible in other ways. 

Now they’ve announced they’re launching a popup studio in London’s fashionable Shoreditch area between August 11 and 23. At this studio the public will be able to drop in and see, with their own eyes, the fantastic works produced by WonderLuk. Even better, you’ll be able to help design bespoke pieces just for you! 

It’s all about bringing the product to the attention of consumers, which is increasingly difficult in our highly-connected world; there are simply too many things for anyone to keep track of. 

In the case of the popup studio, it’s located in the @Boxpark popup zone, where a number of fascinating popups appear weekly. The area is heavily trafficked by pedestrians, so you can be sure many people will drop by and see the works they would otherwise not be able to see. It’s a great idea to promote their product. 

Promotion is so important for such small ventures, as they may often get limited media coverage and then sometimes by tech blogs such as Fabbaloo. While our readers are always interested in 3D printed things, they may not necessarily be interested in purchasing 3D printed women’s jewelry.  

This is a business component that anyone contemplating starting up a 3D print-based business should consider: how to make consumers aware of your product. It’s a huge challenge for any small business, but here WonderLuk is working an interesting “on-the-ground” promotion concept. 

Via WonderLuk

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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