Simplify3D Expands to Support Many More 3D Printers

Independent slicing software maker Simplify3D has upgraded their product to now be compatible with around 200 different 3D printers. 

The latest update, 3.0.2, provides support for another 30 3D printers, including: 

  • 3DP Unlimited 3DP1000
  • ATOM 2.0 3D Printer
  • BeeVeryCreative BeeTheFirst
  • Big Builder 3D Printer
  • Boots Industries BI V2.5
  • CreatBot DM
  • CreatBot DX
  • Dreammaker OverLord
  • Dreammaker OverLord Pro
  • LulzBot TAZ Dual Extruder Version
  • M3D Micro 3D Printer
  • Mankati Fullscale XT Plus
  • Mass Portal Pharaoh ED
  • Morgan 3D RepRap Morgan Mega
  • Morgan 3D RepRap Morgan Pro
  • Multec M200
  • Multec M300
  • Polar3D Printer
  • Printrbot Play
  • Printrbot Plus Metal
  • Rapide Lite 100
  • Rapide Lite 100XL
  • Rapide Lite 200
  • Rapide Lite 200XL
  • Renkforce RF1000
  • RigidBot Regular
  • RigidBot Big
  • Solidoodle Workbench
  • Solidoodle Workbench Apprentice
  • SystemCreate Bellulo
  • Velleman Vertex K8400
  • Wanhao Duplicator i3

If you own a personal 3D printer, it’s more than likely it can be immediately supported by Simplify3D. And if by some remote chance it isn’t, you can likely configure it to do so by creating a new profile yourself. That may be beyond the capability of some users, but it is possible. 

Simplify3D, if you’re not familiar with it, is software that can take a 3D model (STL file) and prepare the appropriate executable GCODE to drive your 3D printer. While every 3D printer already comes with software to do the same function, the difference is that Simplify3D provides a number of advanced slicing features typically not available elsewhere. It also slices complex models nearly instantly, far faster than almost any other 3D slicing system. 

That’s the reason many people will pay USD$149 to get their own copy. Some others may find Simplify3D software bundled with their machine, an option increasingly used by many printer manufacturers wanting to give their offering an edge on the competition. 

Via Simplify3D

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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