3DPrintClean’s Filtrations Solutions Now Available

3DPrintClean’s product line of 3D printer accessories for emission filtration are now available for purchase. 

When we last wrote of 3DPrintClean in March, the company was developing different solutions, but now they’re available for purchase. 

Why do you need something like this? The answer is that most desktop 3D printers are woefully lacking features to ensure the environmental safety of those nearby. The printers are often “open style”, which permits nanoparticles generated by heating plastic to flow freely from the hot end to surrounding air, and eventually your lungs. We’ve long supported the idea of including filtration systems directly into 3D printers, but almost all manufacturers do not yet do this. Note that resin-based 3D printers also produce emissions as liquid resin emits odors and particles. 

What are you going to do in that case? 3DPrintClean offers a solution in the form of a specialized cabinet that fits around your 3D printer and performs the necessary air scrubbing. That’s why the product name is the “Scrubber +”. It includes high-performance air filters and blowers to perform the necessary cleaning - and also includes a set of brilliant LED lights in case your printer doesn’t have those, either. 

At 3DPrintClean’s site we now see a variety of enclosure sizes for sale, one of which no doubt will accommodate your 3D printer. Prices vary by size, with the smallest unit handling a 600 x 600 x 600mm printer for USD$700, to the largest option, a free-standing unit handling a 800 x 800 x 800mm printer for USD$1,200. 

Some may say these prices are high, but you must consider the safety factor and the requirements for high-capability filtering and airflow, able to capture the very small nanoparticles generated by print operations. In fact part of the reason industrial 3D printers are so much more expensive is that they often include such features. Building proper air cleaning facilities in your workshop could also prove more expensive than simply buying an enclosure. 

If you’re concerned about 3D print safety, you might want to check out 3DPrintClean.

Via 3DPrintClean

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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