The World’s Biggest 3D Printer Under Construction

Italy-based WASP is readying their ultimate 3D printer: a 12m printer intended to print entire homes. 

This has long been the goal of the WASP project, and they’ve followed a gradual development of the technology over the past few years that has now led to the point where they can actually implement a house-sized 3D printer. 

Their initial experiments probed the idea of 3D printing in clays, enabling inexpensive access to local print materials. Clay is found nearly everywhere and it turns out to be quite a good 3D printing material, so long as you have the correct equipment and process. That’s what WASP has been developing: the “BigDelta 3D Printer”.  

Here we see some of their earlier experiments, with small machines leading to larger units. At the time we saw these, were told they planned to make a gigantic machine, but now it is actually happening. 

They explain their vision: 

Over the past years WASP has made the very idea of auto production and shared knowledge the heart of its project. The company proposes a vision that goes well beyond that of low cost housing. We are talking about the MakerEconomy, a new model where everything can be self manufactured through shared solutions, These leverage on 3D printing and are tied to meeting life’s primary necessities: work, health and housing.

WASP has demonstrated over several years their competence in developing unusual (and large) 3D printers, so we have confidence the BigDelta will be a success. 

As of this writing, we don’t have any specifications for the machine, but we imagine it will have a very large layer size, otherwise prints would take a very long time to complete. 

The BigDelta will be shown to the public at an event in Ravenna, Italy (WASP’s home location) at a three day event from September 18-20. If you’re nearby, you might want to check out this incredible 3D printer. 

Via WASP

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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