MakerOS Introduces a Very Needed Feature

MakerOS' new AutoQuoter system

MakerOS' new AutoQuoter system

MakerOS is an online service that provides a number of management functions to those operating 3D printing businesses. Now they’ve introduced a key function. 

If you’re not familiar with MakerOS, we did write about them earlier this year and previously. They cater to 3D print business that wish to smooth their workflow by simplifying processes and handling common data tasks, such as sharing files, inventory, tracking print orders, etc. For any shop doing 3D printing, even occasionally, MakerOS is something you should definitely consider using. 

I’m just reading their latest press release, and it seems they’ve now released a new feature that I believe should be of huge interest to those using the system: an “AutoQuoter”. 

This is a process that would enable very rapid calculations to provide a proper and reliable quote to customers requesting 3D print services. You typically see this sort of function on the big 3D print services, where you would upload a file, select some materials and parameter and finally press a button to obtain a print quote. 

Now that kind of functionality is available to you too, if you’re using MakerOS. It can be used behind the scenes by the MakerOS user, or presented to clients directly in an easy-to-use fashion. 

Apparently the service also allows you to link your products to the AutoQuoter to ensure your inventory is kept up to date. 

It’s just another step in how MakerOS is trying to simplify life for those running a 3D print business. Currently the service has no monthly fee during their “Beta” testing period (which I am not sure how long will last; it’s been going on for quite a while now.) However, they do charge a fee for any financial transactions with clients that passes through their system. It’s 10% of the transaction value plus USD$0.75 per transaction. 

That’s a pretty small fee to vastly simply your business workflow. 

Via MakerOS

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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