Additive Industries Introduces an Entry-Level 3D Metal Printer

The new MetalFAB1 Process & Application Development Tool from Additive Industries

The new MetalFAB1 Process & Application Development Tool from Additive Industries

Eindhoven-based Additive Industries produces one of the physically largest 3D metal printing systems, but now they have a smaller version as well.

The company introduced the “MetalFAB1 Process & Application Development Tool” at Additive World this week. The new machine holds the exact same build volume as its much larger sibling, the MetalFAB1. 

The new machine’s name is a bit unique and gives away the purpose of the machine. This is not simply a “mini” version of the original MetalFAB1, if you could use that word on such a large machine. No, it’s specifically for developing a suitable process for use on the larger machine. That, and general prototyping. 

The much larger full-size MetalFAB1 from Additive Industries

The much larger full-size MetalFAB1 from Additive Industries

This falls squarely into the same approach Additive Industries took with the development of MetalFAB1: examine what the customer needs and build a system to match. That’s what the MetalFAB1 does: it is more than just a 3D metal printer. The system includes other modules that perform other required tasks such as post processing. By acquiring such a system, a manufacturer would have most of what they need to get into 3D metal printing. 

An inside view of the new MetalFAB1 Process & Application Development Tool from Additive Industries

An inside view of the new MetalFAB1 Process & Application Development Tool from Additive Industries

But then there’s the question of how best to operate the system given a particular manufacturing job. That’s where the new Process & Application Tool comes in: it can be used to iteratively develop a comprehensive production process that can later be deployed on the big machine. 

The reason for doing the development on a second machine is simply efficiency: a big machine would presumably be busy producing other parts for previous projects and you wouldn’t want to interrupt its production for development. By investing in a second development machine, you could keep your MetalFAB1 running longer producing revenue-generating parts. 

It’s a great idea and demonstrates how Additive Industries understands the issues of manufacturers. 

I don’t have pricing on this new unit, but Additive Industries explains that it has a “competitive price point” and “compact footprint”, but I am certain they can help you with that.  

Via Additive Industries

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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