ZCorp Goes Monochrome!



If the motion picture industry changed from color to black and white, we'd be concerned. The same would be true for ZCorp if they dropped their color technology and retreated to "monochrome" mode for their line of 3D printers. That's not exactly what's going on here: they've announced a new Monochrome 3D printer. Sounds strange, doesn't it? Most 3D printers today are monochrome - but ZCorp's printers use their proprietary Polyjet technology that permits use of more than one color within the same print operation. We think that point of view alone gives a hint of the current state of 3D printing.

So, on to the announcement. It's the ZCorp 350, billed as an inexpensive way to acquire "high-end functionality". What's "high-end", you ask?

  • automatic material loading
  • snap-in binder cartridges
  • integrated recycling of unused build material
  • self-monitoring operation
  • control from both the desktop and printer
  • 0.8 in/hour (20 mm/hour) vertical build speed
  • 8 x 10 x 8 in (203 x 254 x 203 mm) build size
  • 300 x 450 dpi resolution
  • office-safe build materials, aggressive dust-control, and zero liquid waste

Those are very useful features, particularly in a professional environment, and definite differences from the ultra-inexpensive 3D printer kits making the rounds. But there is a catch. A USD$29,500 catch.

Now that might seem like a high price for hobbyists, and it is. However, this device is not aimed at the hobbyist market. It's for professional users in offices that today cannot afford their own 3D printer. Yes, there are 3D printers in this price range, but they don't have the same features. And in an office environment, those features mean dollars. Without the timesaving features, someone will have to do extra work, and those minutes will add up to big savings in the long term.

Via ZCorp

[UPDATE] Commenter kyphon is correct: ZCorp does not use PolyJet - that's Objet's multi-material technology. We suspect someone left the resin out at the Fabbaloo offices and we must have inhaled deeply. Sigh. 

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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