Design of the Week: Smartphone Photo Studio

This week’s selection is the Smartphone Photo Studio kit by Creative Tools. 

Creative Tools is the Sweden-based organization responsible for the incredibly useful #3DBenchy test object, which we’ve used frequently. Now the same company has developed a very useful kit to construct a miniature photo studio that actually works. 

The idea behind a photo studio is to provide consistent lighting and a standard background that makes the image subject stand out. Typically a tabletop studio includes a curved white background that helps spray light over the subject during imaging. In other words, it creates “controlled conditions” for perfect imagery. This is the goal of Creative Tools’ Smartphone Photo Studio. 

They say this “camera rig” is “designed to create a repeatable way to photograph #3DBenchy models at fixed angle positions,” but you can use it for other photographic purposes, too. It even includes a turntable that can slowly rotate an object for video creation. 

While the system was ostensibly designed to enable high quality images of #3DBenchy, as it includes #3DBenchy mounts to show the  benchmark object at 45 degree increments and even upside down, the system’s elements can be used with other objects. 

We are particularly impressed with the uniquely adaptable smartphone mounting system, which you can see in operation in their assembly video here:

And of course, there are universally adaptable mounts for lighting elements, too. 

We should warn you, this is not a single item that you 3D print. Instead it’s a collection of nearly two dozen separate parts that must be printed and assembled properly. In the image at top you can see how this item will appear when completed. 

To simplify 3D printing, they’ve arranged a couple of STL files representing a complete build plate for the parts set. Two different sizes of build plates have been set up, although you can also 3D print each item individually. 

This is a brilliant concept that has been successfully implemented into an easily-3D printed and assembled photography system. 

Via Thingiverse

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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