Kudo3D’s Titan 1 Hi-Res 3D Printer

We got a close look at Kudo3D’s fascinating Titan 1 resin-based 3D printer. 

This machine uses a DLP light engine to solidify whole layers of the printed object at a time, leading to some pretty fast print speeds. The Titan 1’s fastest configuration is 69mm per hour, although we’ve been told by the company that’s now increased by as much as 40% due to recent improvements. That’s fast, which is particularly important for high resolution models that require many layers to print. In the second generation version, the Titan 1 can print 0.035mm layers at 25mm per hour. 

The second gen Titan 1 also has an improved resin tank, the bane of many resin-based 3D printers. Titan 1’s now includes a patented “passive self peeling” teflon layer that should lengthen the lifetime of the tank and maintain more consistent print quality. 

We asked Kudo3D of their policy regarding resins, as some companies make machines capable of using only their proprietary resins. Kudo3D assured us they have an “open resin” policy, permitting use of any resin in the Titan 1. They added that the resin they provide is in fact castable, making the prints much more useful. 

Objects printed on the Titan 1 have extremely good resolution. Here we see a number of intricate objects that seem to have been easily printed on the Titan 1.

Kudo3D is a new company, only two years old. Their Kickstarter launch was extremely successful, hitting their funding targets almost immediately. Since that time they’ve continued to sell units online. 

Can you purchase a Titan 1? Indeed you can, but you’ll have to choose between several options: the basic Titan 1 as shown above, another with a very cool “Red Ruby” cover as shown here. Both of these are priced at USD$2,999, and a final option includes the Red Ruby version with a UV Lamp Package for USD$3,299. 

There’s one catch, however: supplies of equipment are quite limited due to demand and you’ll likely end up on a waiting list for a short while. 

Via Kudo3D

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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