Interesting: 3D Systems Culinary Survives

Last fall 3D Systems performed a kind of “housecleaning” to optimize their operations, cutting out unprofitable divisions and products. But one seems to have survived. 

Dark days fell upon 3D Systems as they performed a significant reorganization, with the main victim being their massive consumer division, which produced the Cube desktop 3D printer. That wasn’t all, as 3D Systems took additional moves to shore up their expenses in anticipation of poor financial results. However, the moves seemed successful as their recent results demonstrate

But I noticed that one unusual domain has not been abandoned by 3D Systems: Culinary. There still exists a Culinary lab, apparently with a series of products. Our team did observe example prints from the culinary machines at CES in January. 

These machines are designed to 3D print edible items, but mostly it’s sugar prints. 3D Systems did exhibit a chocolate machine last year, but I have no idea what became of it. 

It just seemed to me that the culinary market was perhaps not ready for this technology, and certainly it would be far smaller than the consumer market - which was cut. 

And the culinary operations apparently were not entirely discontinued. 

3D Systems’ motives during last fall were to optimize their finances, and that suggests they believe there are revenues to be had in the culinary space, either now or in the near future. Given as how culinary usage does not visibly appear to be widespread, we can assume they’re thinking of the future here. 

And this might make sense: while the culinary market is obviously small, it is a niche no other large 3D printer manufacturer seems to be pursuing at this time. To be sure, there are several far smaller operations selling chocolate printers or food extruders of some type, all are of sizes than 3D Systems. 

Perhaps 3D System is betting this market will grow? Or maybe they have something up their sleeve, in the lab. 

I’ve heard nothing specific about 3D Systems plans in the culinary area, but, given that it is a domain they still have active, it could be an area to watch. 

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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