BCN3D’s New Sigmax Professional Desktop 3D Printer

The rather wide and brand new BCN3D Sigmax desktop 3D printer, showing independent extruders

The rather wide and brand new BCN3D Sigmax desktop 3D printer, showing independent extruders

Spain’s BCN3D announced a new 3D printer, the rather large Sigmax. 

The Sigmax is based on their previous successful machine, the Sigma, a very interesting 3D printer itself. 

Like the Sigma, the Sigmax includes several very powerful features: 

Dual, independent extruders: Unlike most dual extrusion systems involving two hot ends bolted together that move in parallel, these two extruders are truly independent and can operate on different toolpaths simultaneously. 

This means you can not only 3D print in multiple materials (including soluble support for highly complex geometries) or multicolors, but you can 3D print in different modes. 

BCN3D calls one of them “Duplication Mode”, in which the two extruders can print identical copies of an object simultaneously, doubling your print throughput.  

The two modes usable on the new BCN3D Sigmax large format desktop 3D printer

The two modes usable on the new BCN3D Sigmax large format desktop 3D printer

The other mode is “Mirror Mode” where the second object is printed in reverse symmetry. This is very useful if you need to produce two “halves” of an object. 

BCN3D doesn’t say so, but I am wondering if there is another mode in which the two extruders can work together on a single object, increasing the print throughput once again. Nevertheless, you get the idea that the dual independent extruders are a very powerful feature. 

The most notable feature on the Sigmax is certainly the build volume, which is set at a massive 420 x 297 x 210mm. That’s almost like having two large desktop 3D printers in one. I believe this is about as large as you can go and still have the machine sitting on your desktop; otherwise you’re looking at a floor model that may take up more space.

The 2.85mm extruders can handle a variety of materials, including PLA, ABS, PVA, Co-polyester, Nylon, TPU, HIPS and others. These are made possible by the hot end’s high temperature of 280C for printing operations, and the heated print surface, which can hit 100C. 

Software for the Sigmax, like the Sigma, is a customized version of Ultimaker’s open source Cura system, which is very easy to use. However, you can also use third party slicer Simplify3D if desired. 

The Sigmax is available now and priced at €4,470 (USD$5,265). 

Via BCN3D

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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