Design of the Week: DIY Furniture Joints

A 3D printed joint for use in developing your own DIY furniture

A 3D printed joint for use in developing your own DIY furniture

This week’s selection is the practical set of DIY furniture joints by Martina Caset.

The collection is actually a set of six different sets of joints with which you would be able to connect standard sized wooden boards together to create your own furniture design. 

The joints are as follows:

  • “L” 90 degrees
  • “Y” 90, 135 & 135 degrees
  • “T” 90 & 90 degrees
  • “Y” 120, 120, 120 degrees
  • “Y” 120, 60, 180 degrees
  • “L” 120 degrees
A circular shelf set using 3D printed joints

A circular shelf set using 3D printed joints

Argentina-based Caset also includes the corresponding Solidworks files so that you can adjust them if necessary or transform them into your own crazy joint setup.

Caset explains: 

If you ever need a shelf or a library right away, this is just for you! You can DIY your own with this joints and some boards.
What you build depends only on you, you can copy the examples above or invent whatever!
Joints must be fitted with wooden boards. For the wood I base on the standard measure 18.5 mm. You can screw it to the wall if necessary. Check the panels I uploaded with the images for further info.

Caset advises printing these joints in ABS material, as it could be that PLA is too brittle to withstand the stresses of being used in furniture. I suspect nylon would also be a good choice, if your equipment is able to 3D print in that material. 

Planning out a furniture project using the 3D printed joint component set

Planning out a furniture project using the 3D printed joint component set

What I particularly like about this design is that it is a toolkit; we don’t actually know what will result from your use of it - and you may not know either until you’re finished. 

That said, it’s always good to have a plan in mind. You can easily design a 2D representation of your goal and then select the appropriate quantity of joints to 3D print. Those, combined with some boards and screws from your local hardware store should get you a very cool new shelf. 

Files available at no charge from Thingiverse. 

Via Thingiverse

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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