Design of the Week: Low Poly Figure

 An artistic low poly figure

An artistic low poly figure

This week’s selection is the interesting Low Poly Figure by designer Wesley Millora.

The figure by Buenos Aires-based Wesley Millora is definitely low poly, an artistic treatment increasingly used in the 3D print world due to its amenable nature on the equipment. 

I like the figure because it has a very interesting style that is somehow reminiscent of art deco designs. In particular, the face of the figure looks like something from an ancient film of 1928. 

 Front and back profile of the Low Poly Figure

Front and back profile of the Low Poly Figure

This design is available on Cults3D, where you can purchase it for the rock-bottom price of USD$2.57. It comes in nine parts, some of which you will have to print with support structures. 

There is another reason I like this 3D model, and that is a particular 3D print made from it by Argentina-based Trideo, who posted this image on Cults3D of their experience. They made the figure life size!

 A life-sized 3D print of the Low Poly Figure

A life-sized 3D print of the Low Poly Figure

I’m not sure what they printed this on as they don’t specify any model on their post, but it’s likely their Print Box Max, which has a build volume of 300 x 300 x 350mm, more than enough to 3D print each of the nine parts of the figure at or near life size. They say: 

More than 1,90 meter / About 23kg of filament / more than 250h printing time for the 9 parts... We really enjoy turning small design into big prints :)

And at around USD$20 per kg, that means this print cost almost USD$500 in material alone! But remember that if you attempted to buy something like this from a commercial source, you’d pay far more than that. 

With the increasing availability of larger volume 3D printers, I am wondering whether we are going to see more large prints such as this one. 

Via Cults3D

General Fabb

Kerry Stevenson, aka "General Fabb" has been writing Fabbaloo posts since he launched the venture in 2007, with an intention to promote and grow the incredible technology of 3D printing across the world. So far, it seems to be working!

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